In Frame: July 23, 2014

Portrait of Alex Franka by Robb Hohmann

Portrait of Alex Franka by Robb Hohmann

It’s been a while since we featured a straight-up portrait, so when this nicely lit, light-hearted shot from Robb Hohmann showed up in the pool, it was a shoo-in for today’s selection.

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Exposed Interview: Victoria Pickering

Fountains by Victoria Pickering

If you frequent downtown, take public transportation, participate in cultural events, or just go about your everyday life in D.C., you might find yourself in one of Victoria Pickering’s photographs.

Victoria’s work has been featured in the Exposed DC Photography Show twice (2013 and 2014), with work that provides a unique perspective of the urban environment and how people fill the city and its spaces.

Because she posts her images online under a creative commons license, Victoria’s work has been featured on numerous websites, which has subsequently led to commercial work that she wouldn’t have gotten otherwise. We asked Victoria a few questions about her love for photography.

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In Frame: July 21, 2014

900 7th Street by Messay Shoakena

900 7th Street by Messay Shoakena

Photographer Messay Shoakena caught this scene at 900 7th St NW in Chinatown. We love the silhouette and the light flowing from the building onto the street.

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Friday Links

The end of the week is nigh! So you’re gonna need some links to help you cross into the next world. Or the weekend. We have the winners of Nat Geo’s first drone photography contest, the top World Cup photos and why they’re so fab, an interview with Exposed alum Jim Darling, and tigers designing jeans. Head towards the light:

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The Places We Find Photography – Andrew Wyeth’s Paintings at NGA

Andrew Wyeth, Wind from the Sea, 1947

Andrew Wyeth, Wind from the Sea, 1947

Looking Out, Looking In at the National Gallery of Art is a small, humble show featuring mid-century artist Andrew Wyeth’s paintings of windows and farmhouses – a show that quickly became one of my all-time favorite exhibits. You will not see his most famous painting, Christina’s World, or images of his muse Helga; instead, the NGA has followed the thread from their painting, Wind from the Sea, which is regularly on view. This is an emotional journey through light, movement, and contemplation—not only in the process of his paintings but the process of where your mind wanders while looking at art. These works felt familiar but I could not unravel the why at first—this is the first I’ve seen most of these works. I looked back and forth between the paintings and their labels—the dates struck me. The 1940s through 70s were not frequented with many ethereal, subject-driven paintings.

However, photography was.

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